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Self-propagating images

Two new works built from simple geometric shapes. They radiate outward from the center, creating more complex designs. The patterns could continue indefinitely, I suppose. Notice the pinwheels in Image no. 2; they may not be apparent at first glance.

Self-propagating image No. 1

Self-propagating image No. 1

Self-propagating image No. 2

Self-propagating image No. 2

There is an African basis for the choice of colors: black, white, orange, and brown. The images are approximately 20 x 20 square.

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Sonata No. 3 for Harpsichord is here

My first two solos for harpsichord were written over 20 years ago. So finally, number three! This piece is very much in the spirit of the earlier works.

Below is a computer realization of the entire work (in three movements). Yes, it will have considerably more expression when you non-robots give it a try. But as I did in a previous blog about Sonata No. 2 for Two Harpsichords, the realization features the Ruckers 1628 app—the most realistic harpsichord fakery on the planet.

A PDF of the piece is available for a nominal fee in the Buy Sheet Music section of this website.

Enjoy!

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Ruckers 1628 Harpsichord App in Action

Ruckers_Cembalo

Maybe you’ve heard about the Ruckers 1628 app for harpsichord for iPhone and iPad. I had it for a while because it’s an amazingly detailed sample of a great historic instrument. Problem was, I’m pretty ignorant about technology. My friend Randall Prentice helped me to figure out how to get it to play a MIDI file using Cubasis. Basically, export the MIDI file to Cubasis, then open the Ruckers app and do an inter-app handshake. The result is a great computer-generated performance.

Below is a performance of Sonata No. 2 for Two Harpsichords, the third movement. Mind you, the performance is right out of Finale, so there’s no rubato. Still, it’s an exciting way to present harpsichord music in lieu of real performers!

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Premiere of Sonata No. 2 for Two Harpsichords

Edwin McLean’s Sonata No. 2 for Two Harpsichords (2014), an Alienor commissioned work, received its premiere performance at McGill University (Montréal, Canada) on May 23, 2015. The performers were Elaine Funaro and Beverly Biggs. The occasion of the premiere was the Ninth Alienor competition final concert featuring juried works and another commissioned duo by Mark Janello.

DSC_0025(Elaine Funaro on left, Beverly Biggs on right)

Elaine and Beverly then went on to Stonington CT and performed the new duo at the La Grua Center on June 6, 2015. They were joined by Rebecca Pechefsky for a performance of  McLean’s Sonata for Three Harpsichords on the same program.

On June 18, the trio moved on to the Boston Early Music Festival, where they performed the same two works again. Below are some lovely pictures of the event.
MM 150606 Biggs-Funaro-Pechefsky A

From left to right: Rebecca Pechefsky, Elaine Funaro, Beverly Biggs

MM 150606 Biggs-Funaro-Pechefsky G

Thank you for three marvelous performances!

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